Swift Riposte

Lunghu wishes to apologize to any European air travelers who were recently inconvenienced by the mysterious failure of air traffic control systems in Britain.  Not that he’s in any way responsible under tort law, but because his previous post neglected to state what should have been obvious and inevitable: that Russia would retaliate for the brazen insult to Comrade Bear‘s manhood orchestrated by British Museum executives.  Revenge, it would seem, isn’t always a dish best served cold:

An unprecedented computer systems failure touched off [Friday’s] mayhem that caused delays and canceled flights for thousands of passengers, the U.K.-based NATS air traffic management company said Saturday.  The computer failure made it impossible for controllers to access data regarding individual flight plans, and many planes were prevented from taking off.

Heafrow_20141212

NATS said the problems at its control center in Swanwick occurred as more workstations were being brought on line to deal with an increase in traffic.  “The number of workstations in use versus [those] in standby fluctuates with the demands of the traffic being controlled.  In this instance a transition between the two states caused a failure in the system which has not been seen before.”

Timeline

Sunday 7 December:  250th anniversary of the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg.  Lunghu publishes an insolent blogpost about Britain’s loan to the exhibit.

Monday 8 December:  Hermitage Museum is closed every Monday.

Tuesday 9 December:  Comrade Bear visits the Hermitage Museum for a photo op with the principal curator. But not with Ilissos.

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Friday 12 December:  British air traffic control computer systems crash during a load-balancing “state transition.”

Agit-prop

As far as Lunghu is concerned, the principal question remaining open is whether Russian hackers did this themselves or outsourced the job to North Koreans, perhaps as a partial swap for the splendid work performed by Russian technical specialists at Sony Corporation earlier this year.  Either way, it’s likely that another shoe will drop —somewhere, sometime soon.

 

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